Centennial trees in Cyprus

Design: Manolis Emmanouel

Centennial trees, as nature’s monuments, are elements of our natural and cultural heritage. Such trees have managed to survive both bad weather conditions over the centuries as well as the disastrous insanity of fire and the inconsiderate human actions. Their existence runs alongside many important historical events and it is often connected to the traditions, myths and legends of our long-suffering island.
The centennial trees illustrated in these stamps are the Agia Mavri Oriental Plane, the Cypress in Kathikas and the Terebinth Tree in Apesia.

Agia Mavri Oriental Plane
(Platanus orientalis)

With a girth at breast height of 8.20 m and 38 m in height, this tree is approximately 800 years old. This is a deciduous tree with a dense crown and a grey to white or grey to brown bark with palmate-like leaves borne alternatively on the stem. It is native to Cyprus and found in riverine settings and near springs. In 2004 it was declared protected.

Cypress in Kathikas
(Cupressus sempervirens)

With a girth at breast height of 4.35 m and 14 m in height, this tree is approximately 700 years old. This is an evergreen tree with  a broad or narrowly conical crown and a grey bark lightly fissured. It has small
scale-like leaves arranged in opposite decussate pairs. It is native to Cyprus and often found in calcareous precipices and slopes in many places of the island and mainly in the Pentadaktylos massif. In 2017 it was declared protected.

Terebinth Tree in Apesia
(Pistacia atlantica)

With a girth at breast height of 6.80 m and 10 m in height, this tree is approximately 1,500 years old. This is a robust deciduous tree with a dense crown, a brown-grey bark and compound leaves. It is native to Cyprus and found in villages, fields, rocky slopes, houses’ yards and near chapels in many places on the island. In 2004, it was declared protected.